Video Club Recruits New Members

By Anastasia Nicholas

Junior broadcasting students Amber Burrows and Hanna Prezelj gleefully work the prompter. Meanwhile, their classmates, Baylee Badawy, senior, Joey Bubis, sophomore, and Nick Mowry, sophomore, pore over the neighboring Tricaster. Photo by Anastasia Nicholas.

Junior broadcasting students Amber Burrows and Hanna Prezelj gleefully work the prompter. Meanwhile, their classmates, Baylee Badawy, senior; Joey Bubis, sophomore; and Nick Mowry, sophomore, work with the Tricaster.
Photo by Anastasia Nicholas

Ever wonder what goes on behind the scenes on TV and film? Anyone interested can join the school’s Video Club this year by visiting Mr. Hemery now in room 312. The club requires no prior skills and would be fun and exciting for anyone.

“Everyone should join Video Club,” said Mr. Hemery, the Video Club adviser. “You don’t even need to be necessarily interested in that as a career.”

Video Club’s primary focus is to capture school events and then share them with the greater community. They are recorded to DVDs and broadcasted on the cable channel as well. Members of Video Club shoot footage at these events and then meet to do edits and post-production work.

Anyone who joins Video Club will experience the goings-on and witness the talent of the school community. They will attend events such as choir, band, prom, and graduation. Additionally, they will then have the opportunity to share these events with a broader audience.

“We meet for every shoot we have,” said Mr. Hemery. “Our meetings are short, and they’re usually just signups. It’s a nontraditional club, so it’s nice for students who are already involved with other clubs. Students can stop in and meet briefly.”

Mr. Hemery, Video Club leader, peers into my camera while standing behind his own.  Photo by Anastasia Nicholas.

Mr. Hemery, Video Club adviser, peers into my camera while standing behind his own.
Photo by Anastasia Nicholas

Despite funding challenges, Video Club still flourishes. An obstacle Video Club is forced to overcome is funding. It gets none from the school, so they are constantly fundraising through DVD sales to pay for new and broken equipment.

“Video technology is constantly getting updated, and it’s expensive,” said Mr. Hemery. “For example, our Tricaster cost $12,000. If something were to happen to that, I have no budget from the school, so we’d have to raise $12,000.”

Advice for an aspiring Video Club member? “Come to a shoot,” said Mr. Hemery. “I find students have a tendency to get hooked. Just come and try it out. It’s one hour of your time. But like I said, most students are really dedicated for life.”